Meet our digitisation partners

Since 2010, we have partnered with many organisations, big and small, as well as individuals to put digitised content onto Trove for everyone.

Our partners are diverse and include large state libraries and universities as well as local councils, historical societies, faith and cultural groups, family history groups and businesses.

Meet some of our digitisation partners:

Digitising Art in Australia

University of Wollongong, University of New South Wales and the National Library

Image of six pages from the Art in Australia magazine

In 2016, the University of Wollongong (UOW) Library and the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Library partnered with the National Library to digitise Art in Australia (1916-1942) and make it available from Trove.

How big was the project?

A total of 9,690 pages were digitised and delivered on Trove, and it took three months to complete the work.

How did the partnership work?

For this project, the UOW and UNSW supplied us with digital images which met the National Library’s specifications. UNSW Library held an almost complete collection of Art in Australia and were able to contribute 47 issues, including a special architecture issue from 1919.

What was the total cost of the project?

The cost for end-to-end digitisation and delivery to Trove for this project is $14,535 (GST exclusive).

For this project, our digitisation partners’ contributions were in-kind.

What our partners said about having Art in Australia on Trove

UOW Library Director Margie Jantti said the publication offers a unique, historical aspect to Australian art and artists and the development of prominent art collections in Australia.

“UOW Library has kept an incomplete set of Art in Australia within its rare books collection for a number of years. This small but beautiful set was very rarely accessed because its delicate condition requires it to be kept safely from the open shelves. It’s very exciting that we are now able to share this resource with the wider community both locally and globally”

Martin Borchert, University Librarian at UNSW Australia said he is pleased the libraries have been able to collaborate to give this historic and beautiful Australian art publication “a second life” via a digitisation program, and by making it available on open access.

“The freely and openly available online format allows everyone—researchers, students and the community—to enjoy and benefit from accessing this title,” he said.

Rebecca Daly, Associate Director, Collections & Scholarly Communications at UOW Library, described Trove as “a beautiful platform” allowing the exquisite high quality plates of this major resource for Australian art history to be made freely available online in high resolution for the first time.

Did you have any problems digitising Art in Australia?

According to Rebecca Daly (UOW):

  • Art in Australia was published in the early twentieth century on high quality paper. To maintain the integrity of the physical item whilst digitising it, staff took care not to stress the tight binding of the pages.
  • We were required to work with the NLA image capture standards to ensure the material was of suitable digital quality for inclusion in Trove. This initially took some investigation and testing, but was ultimately valuable in informing our own standards for digitisation, which are now modelled closely on NLA’s.

 

Digitising the Dookie & Katamatite Recorder

Dookie and District Historical Society

Image of several articles from the Dookie and Katamatite Recorder newspaper

 

In 2016, the Dookie and District Historical Society partnered with the National Library to digitise the Dookie & Katamatite Recorder (1902-1920) and make it available from Trove.

How big was the project? 

A total of 2,824 pages were digitised and delivered on Trove, and it took 4 months to complete the work.

How did the partnership work?

The Public Record Office, Victoria awarded a grant to the Dookie and District Historical Society who provided the National Library with the funds for the entire project from digital capture and optical character recognition (OCR) processing through to providing permanent online access on Trove. The State Library of Victoria lent its microfilm copy of the Dookie & Katamatite Recorder which was scanned to provide the digital images. The National Library managed the entire project.

What was the total cost of the project? 

The cost for the project was $5,930.40 (GST exclusive).

What our partners said about having Dookie & Katamatite Recorder on Trove

”The National Library’s digitisation partnership is a brilliant service and the benefits of having our local newspaper on Trove are free online access for everyone.”

Did you have any problems digitising the Dookie & Katamatite Recorder?

“No. We were very happy with the outcome of the project and the State Library of Victoria was very helpful in lending their master microfilm.”